Grant Morrison’s ‘Multiversity’ has finally been given a release date. Spoken of in hushed whispers in sleazy back alley dives as far back as 2009 (although the man himself says it’s been “almost eight years in the making”), it will hit the shelves in August this year.Featuring art from the likes of Frank Quitely (naturally), Ivan Reis, Chris Sprouse and a whooooole bunch o’ others, each issue of the limited series will be 40 pages (and really, really pretty).This is what Mr Morrison had to say about it –
“’The Multiversity’ has been a labor of love almost eight years in the making, and brings together an unstoppable supergroup of artists — Reis, Sprouse, Oliver, Quitely, Stewart and more — with a cast of unforgettable characters from the 52 alternative Earths of the known DC Multiverse!
“Prepare to meet the Vampire Justice League of Earth-43, the Justice Riders of Earth-18, Superdemon, Doc Fate, the super-sons of Superman and Batman, the rampaging Retaliators of Earth-8, the Atomic Knights of Justice, Dino-Cop, Sister Miracle, Lady Quark, the legion of Sivanas, the Nazi New Reichsmen of Earth-10 and the LATEST, greatest superhero of Earth-Prime — YOU!
Comprising seven complete adventures — each set in a different parallel universe — a two part framing story, and comprehensive guidebook to the many worlds of the Multiverse, ‘The Multiversity’ is more than just a multi-part comic book series, it’s a cosmos-spanning, soul-shaking experience that puts YOU on the front line in the Battle For All Creation against the demonic destroyers known as the Gentry!
But beware! Power has a cost, and at the heart of this epic tale waits the cursed and malignant comic book called ‘Ultra Comics’…
How safe is YOUR head?
Join us, if you dare, for ‘The Multiversity!’” — Grant Morrison
So, whaddaya think? Excited for this or will ya pass?
(Algie)

Grant Morrison’s ‘Multiversity’ has finally been given a release date. Spoken of in hushed whispers in sleazy back alley dives as far back as 2009 (although the man himself says it’s been “almost eight years in the making”), it will hit the shelves in August this year.
Featuring art from the likes of Frank Quitely (naturally), Ivan Reis, Chris Sprouse and a whooooole bunch o’ others, each issue of the limited series will be 40 pages (and really, really pretty).
This is what Mr Morrison had to say about it –

“’The Multiversity’ has been a labor of love almost eight years in the making, and brings together an unstoppable supergroup of artists — Reis, Sprouse, Oliver, Quitely, Stewart and more — with a cast of unforgettable characters from the 52 alternative Earths of the known DC Multiverse!

“Prepare to meet the Vampire Justice League of Earth-43, the Justice Riders of Earth-18, Superdemon, Doc Fate, the super-sons of Superman and Batman, the rampaging Retaliators of Earth-8, the Atomic Knights of Justice, Dino-Cop, Sister Miracle, Lady Quark, the legion of Sivanas, the Nazi New Reichsmen of Earth-10 and the LATEST, greatest superhero of Earth-Prime — YOU!

Comprising seven complete adventures — each set in a different parallel universe — a two part framing story, and comprehensive guidebook to the many worlds of the Multiverse, ‘The Multiversity’ is more than just a multi-part comic book series, it’s a cosmos-spanning, soul-shaking experience that puts YOU on the front line in the Battle For All Creation against the demonic destroyers known as the Gentry!

But beware! Power has a cost, and at the heart of this epic tale waits the cursed and malignant comic book called ‘Ultra Comics’…

How safe is YOUR head?

Join us, if you dare, for ‘The Multiversity!’” — Grant Morrison

So, whaddaya think? Excited for this or will ya pass?

(Algie)

Manga, Manga Everywhere so Let’s Sit Down and Read
Good evening ladies and gentlemen! Tonight I thought I would deviate slightly from our usual subject matter, though only slightly. Tonight I would like to present to you a series of novels written by Kikuchi Hideyuki cataloguing the adventures of Vampire Hunter D in a post-apocalyptic future world. The novels took many many years to be translated into English. In fact roughly twenty! In the meantime they inspired two animated movies which were handled very differently. The first just titled “Vampire Hunter D” was made in the mid eighties, and took the characters and broad plot of the first of Hideyuki’s books. This movie enjoyed some cult success and had a rough charm about its rather basic and low budget animation and synthesized music. The second movie was a much grander affair and focused on the events of the third book. Released in the early 2000’s and directed by Ashida Toyoo “Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust” has claimed a much broader appeal with newer younger fans. I could speak at length about these two very different interpretations but I’m here to speak about the novels. (Note: it has also been released as manga, but I haven’t been able to track these down so far…looking out for them though!)
Before you navigate away thinking, “Great more freakin’ vampires!” This is something a million miles away from True Blood and Twilight. This is a vampire series that came before Blade and other dystopian classics such as Bladerunner. The world it depicts is dark and cruel and resembles more the dark ages than a far future. Only the cyberhorses and some of the weaponry and vehicles that appear remind us we’re not reading about 1200 and something. D is a one of a kind among bounty hunters some more honourable than others. Not only is he tall and silent, supernaturally attractive and incredible good at what he does; he is also a dhampir (or a dunpeal depending on which translation you read). This means he is half human and half vampire. As so often in fiction and real life, hybrids enjoy less love than you might suspect.
D hunts in a world where the supernatural scum which we humans all believed in our current modern age to be nothing but the inhabitants of our nightmares, are all too real. Hideyuki reveals slowly, slowly, slowly to us drip-feeding the reason for the bleak future is due to us human beings. We did what we feared most and almost destroyed the planet via our nuclear weapons and almost wiped ourselves out. When some sort of equilibrium returned we found ourselves ignorant of our past and surrounded by the ghouls and monsters of the night who now thrived in this middle-ages-esque world. Humans here eek out a meagre living and are the prey of every other creature, the peak of the nobility being the vampires.
One of the most interesting images the writer paints is that of the search for ways to kill vampires. Human have forgotten so much over the generations that they no longer recognise the significance of the cross only that it keeps the blood sucking aristocrats at bay. That is a very appealing and refreshing take on vampires for me. We also have this return to the Le Stat type vampire who is a snob and who lives in a twilight world of meaningless luxury as opposed to jean-clad, muscle bound pretty boys.
D himself is a quiet but tragic protagonist who is neither hero nor anti-hero. He simply exists and does what he must for reasons, we nor any of his fleeting companions can or will ever understand. Throughout the books, illustrating legend Amano Yoshitaka provides beautiful ethereal illustrations which reminded me of that one slightly scary and unnerving fairy tale anthology we all had that went back to a parent or grandparent, and we only looked at in daylight because it was too strange and freaky to read at night. He paints an androgynous D who, in his wide brimmed hat is always straight faced and solemn; almost tragic.
These books are a wonderful read and although the accompanying visuals are whispy and wistful, the books themselves have their fair share of grim, violent and sometimes disturbing sexual content that somehow makes us feel the vampire slaying, conscienceless hunter is more saint than monster. There is a stark disparity between the gross and dim reality of the world and the little glimmers of purity that can be glimpsed now and again.
Highly recommended reading!
(Kirsty)

Manga, Manga Everywhere so Let’s Sit Down and Read

Good evening ladies and gentlemen! Tonight I thought I would deviate slightly from our usual subject matter, though only slightly. Tonight I would like to present to you a series of novels written by Kikuchi Hideyuki cataloguing the adventures of Vampire Hunter D in a post-apocalyptic future world. The novels took many many years to be translated into English. In fact roughly twenty! In the meantime they inspired two animated movies which were handled very differently. The first just titled “Vampire Hunter D” was made in the mid eighties, and took the characters and broad plot of the first of Hideyuki’s books. This movie enjoyed some cult success and had a rough charm about its rather basic and low budget animation and synthesized music. The second movie was a much grander affair and focused on the events of the third book. Released in the early 2000’s and directed by Ashida Toyoo “Vampire Hunter D: Bloodlust” has claimed a much broader appeal with newer younger fans. I could speak at length about these two very different interpretations but I’m here to speak about the novels. (Note: it has also been released as manga, but I haven’t been able to track these down so far…looking out for them though!)

Before you navigate away thinking, “Great more freakin’ vampires!” This is something a million miles away from True Blood and Twilight. This is a vampire series that came before Blade and other dystopian classics such as Bladerunner. The world it depicts is dark and cruel and resembles more the dark ages than a far future. Only the cyberhorses and some of the weaponry and vehicles that appear remind us we’re not reading about 1200 and something. D is a one of a kind among bounty hunters some more honourable than others. Not only is he tall and silent, supernaturally attractive and incredible good at what he does; he is also a dhampir (or a dunpeal depending on which translation you read). This means he is half human and half vampire. As so often in fiction and real life, hybrids enjoy less love than you might suspect.

D hunts in a world where the supernatural scum which we humans all believed in our current modern age to be nothing but the inhabitants of our nightmares, are all too real. Hideyuki reveals slowly, slowly, slowly to us drip-feeding the reason for the bleak future is due to us human beings. We did what we feared most and almost destroyed the planet via our nuclear weapons and almost wiped ourselves out. When some sort of equilibrium returned we found ourselves ignorant of our past and surrounded by the ghouls and monsters of the night who now thrived in this middle-ages-esque world. Humans here eek out a meagre living and are the prey of every other creature, the peak of the nobility being the vampires.

One of the most interesting images the writer paints is that of the search for ways to kill vampires. Human have forgotten so much over the generations that they no longer recognise the significance of the cross only that it keeps the blood sucking aristocrats at bay. That is a very appealing and refreshing take on vampires for me. We also have this return to the Le Stat type vampire who is a snob and who lives in a twilight world of meaningless luxury as opposed to jean-clad, muscle bound pretty boys.

D himself is a quiet but tragic protagonist who is neither hero nor anti-hero. He simply exists and does what he must for reasons, we nor any of his fleeting companions can or will ever understand. Throughout the books, illustrating legend Amano Yoshitaka provides beautiful ethereal illustrations which reminded me of that one slightly scary and unnerving fairy tale anthology we all had that went back to a parent or grandparent, and we only looked at in daylight because it was too strange and freaky to read at night. He paints an androgynous D who, in his wide brimmed hat is always straight faced and solemn; almost tragic.

These books are a wonderful read and although the accompanying visuals are whispy and wistful, the books themselves have their fair share of grim, violent and sometimes disturbing sexual content that somehow makes us feel the vampire slaying, conscienceless hunter is more saint than monster. There is a stark disparity between the gross and dim reality of the world and the little glimmers of purity that can be glimpsed now and again.

Highly recommended reading!

(Kirsty)

HAIL HYDRA!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1406166082945432/?fref=ts#
Good evening folks. This week saw the launch of the ongoing Nightcrawler title, marking the return of Chris Claremont to the mainstream X books after an absence of almost eight years. Accordingly, my focus this week is on these creators that return to titles or characters where they have made their mark. Unfortunately, lightning is not always guaranteed to strike twice.
Despite his long absence from the X-books, the characters and concepts created by Claremont continue to drive the franchise. Although he commenced work on Uncanny X-Men shortly after the introduction of Wolverine, Storm, Colossus and Nightcrawler, it was his work in developing and guiding these characters that helped them become mainstays of the franchise. Characters such as Rogue, Gambit, Psylocke, Havok and Magneto were either created by Claremont or under his writing developed a complexity and depth that they had seldom enjoyed in the past. Claremont’s villains, including Mr Sinister, the Hellfire Club, Nimrod and Dark Phoenix continue to be used by successive writers, while concepts and locations he introduced such as Genosha, Muir Island and Madripoor are rarely absent from the comics for long.
With such an impressive pedigree it would seem natural that Claremont’s position as an X-legend would be secure, with fans and creators alike paying tribute to his work in the wake of his controversial departure from Marvel in 1991. The years following this saw the core titles struggle to emerge from Claremont’s shadow, with writers such as Scott Lobdell and Fabian Nicieza making a conscious attempt to imitate his writing style. Fast forward 20+ years and the return of Claremont to the X-universe, chronicling the adventures of one its most beloved characters, is met with what appears to be generally low expectations from the fan base.
A large part of the reason for this is that this is not the first time Claremont has returned to chronicle the adventures of Marvel’s merry band of mutants. His first return, in 2000, saw him take over both X-Men and Uncanny X-Men. Released at a time when the first X-Men movie was generating unparalleled exposure for the brand, this run - cut short after only nine months - is generally regarded as a disaster. Featuring uninspired villains, countless generic fight scenes and random changes to the status quo (Nightcrawler as a priest; Rogue and Colossus kissing), this run must have tested the patience of even the most fervent Claremont fan.
Claremont’s other X-Men work since this point has ranged from solid to terrible. While X-treme X-Men was better than the horrific name implied, his run on Excalibur (and later, New Excalibur) was poorly received. The stories in his later return to Uncanny X-Men in 2004 were examples of solid super heroics, but rarely inspired. Marvel’s decision to launch X-Men Forever, in 2009, was an attempt to allow him to play to his strengths by continuing his stories from where his original run left off in X-Men issue 3. This concept did not last long and it quickly became apparent that he was taking the opportunity to write a new version of the X-Men, one that acted as mutant marmite, dividing fans as to its merits (my view? Goofy as heck, but compulsively readable).
Claremont’s not the first writer to find that there are huge risks involved in returning to titles or characters where they have enjoyed past success. Jim Shooter’s return to the Legion of Superheroes was short lived after being poorly received by fans, and by the end of its run Frank Miller’s All Star Batman and Robin appeared to be purchased by readers primarily so they could discuss the increasingly outlandish events depicted within. Even Stan Lee’s aura has been diminished by his more recent works. While his involvement in Marvel anniversary issues is always welcome, the tongue in cheek nature and corny dialogue of his modern contributions have tended to minimise the huge contribution he made to Marvel in the 1960s, retroactively assigning his storytelling partners with an even greater share of the credit for success.
There are many reasons why creators may wish to return to titles. It may be a sense of unfinished business, it may be a love of the characters, it may even be a large financial incentive. Regardless of the reason, it’s often a huge risk because these creators aren’t just competing against their peers, they’re competing with their own reputations. Much of the time this places such creators in a no-win situation. Attempt to write in their own style and they’re accused of being outdated, relying on stock phrases and situations. Attempt to try something different and they’re left open to the inevitable accusation that ‘their old stuff was better’.
This isn’t just confined to comics. The return of Kenny Dalglish to managing Liverpool, the decision of George Lucas to make Star Wars prequels, the return of Only Fools and Horses. In each instance the success of the initial endeavour has created a mythology that each returnee must live up to. Unfortunately, in such instances the vagrancies of memory ensure that after the fact, only the triumphs are remembered to be compared. Hence why when Kenny Dalglish returned as Liverpool Manager the fan base expected him to live up to the nine trophies he won during his initial spell, not live down to the defeats or the dull no score draws.
In Infinite Crisis, Batman confronts Superman with the statement that the last time he really inspired anyone was when he was dead. For those brave creators that return to their seminal titles, that is the difficult challenge they face. Absence may well make the heart grow fonder, but it also means that upon their return, even their best may no longer be deemed good enough.
Are you looking forward to Chris Claremont’s return to Nightcrawler? Are there any creator returns that have disappointed you, or are there any that have surpassed your expectations? Let me know in the comments below.(Gary)

Good evening folks. This week saw the launch of the ongoing Nightcrawler title, marking the return of Chris Claremont to the mainstream X books after an absence of almost eight years. Accordingly, my focus this week is on these creators that return to titles or characters where they have made their mark. Unfortunately, lightning is not always guaranteed to strike twice.

Despite his long absence from the X-books, the characters and concepts created by Claremont continue to drive the franchise. Although he commenced work on Uncanny X-Men shortly after the introduction of Wolverine, Storm, Colossus and Nightcrawler, it was his work in developing and guiding these characters that helped them become mainstays of the franchise. Characters such as Rogue, Gambit, Psylocke, Havok and Magneto were either created by Claremont or under his writing developed a complexity and depth that they had seldom enjoyed in the past. Claremont’s villains, including Mr Sinister, the Hellfire Club, Nimrod and Dark Phoenix continue to be used by successive writers, while concepts and locations he introduced such as Genosha, Muir Island and Madripoor are rarely absent from the comics for long.

With such an impressive pedigree it would seem natural that Claremont’s position as an X-legend would be secure, with fans and creators alike paying tribute to his work in the wake of his controversial departure from Marvel in 1991. The years following this saw the core titles struggle to emerge from Claremont’s shadow, with writers such as Scott Lobdell and Fabian Nicieza making a conscious attempt to imitate his writing style. Fast forward 20+ years and the return of Claremont to the X-universe, chronicling the adventures of one its most beloved characters, is met with what appears to be generally low expectations from the fan base.

A large part of the reason for this is that this is not the first time Claremont has returned to chronicle the adventures of Marvel’s merry band of mutants. His first return, in 2000, saw him take over both X-Men and Uncanny X-Men. Released at a time when the first X-Men movie was generating unparalleled exposure for the brand, this run - cut short after only nine months - is generally regarded as a disaster. Featuring uninspired villains, countless generic fight scenes and random changes to the status quo (Nightcrawler as a priest; Rogue and Colossus kissing), this run must have tested the patience of even the most fervent Claremont fan.

Claremont’s other X-Men work since this point has ranged from solid to terrible. While X-treme X-Men was better than the horrific name implied, his run on Excalibur (and later, New Excalibur) was poorly received. The stories in his later return to Uncanny X-Men in 2004 were examples of solid super heroics, but rarely inspired. Marvel’s decision to launch X-Men Forever, in 2009, was an attempt to allow him to play to his strengths by continuing his stories from where his original run left off in X-Men issue 3. This concept did not last long and it quickly became apparent that he was taking the opportunity to write a new version of the X-Men, one that acted as mutant marmite, dividing fans as to its merits (my view? Goofy as heck, but compulsively readable).

Claremont’s not the first writer to find that there are huge risks involved in returning to titles or characters where they have enjoyed past success. Jim Shooter’s return to the Legion of Superheroes was short lived after being poorly received by fans, and by the end of its run Frank Miller’s All Star Batman and Robin appeared to be purchased by readers primarily so they could discuss the increasingly outlandish events depicted within. Even Stan Lee’s aura has been diminished by his more recent works. While his involvement in Marvel anniversary issues is always welcome, the tongue in cheek nature and corny dialogue of his modern contributions have tended to minimise the huge contribution he made to Marvel in the 1960s, retroactively assigning his storytelling partners with an even greater share of the credit for success.

There are many reasons why creators may wish to return to titles. It may be a sense of unfinished business, it may be a love of the characters, it may even be a large financial incentive. Regardless of the reason, it’s often a huge risk because these creators aren’t just competing against their peers, they’re competing with their own reputations. Much of the time this places such creators in a no-win situation. Attempt to write in their own style and they’re accused of being outdated, relying on stock phrases and situations. Attempt to try something different and they’re left open to the inevitable accusation that ‘their old stuff was better’.

This isn’t just confined to comics. The return of Kenny Dalglish to managing Liverpool, the decision of George Lucas to make Star Wars prequels, the return of Only Fools and Horses. In each instance the success of the initial endeavour has created a mythology that each returnee must live up to. Unfortunately, in such instances the vagrancies of memory ensure that after the fact, only the triumphs are remembered to be compared. Hence why when Kenny Dalglish returned as Liverpool Manager the fan base expected him to live up to the nine trophies he won during his initial spell, not live down to the defeats or the dull no score draws.

In Infinite Crisis, Batman confronts Superman with the statement that the last time he really inspired anyone was when he was dead. For those brave creators that return to their seminal titles, that is the difficult challenge they face. Absence may well make the heart grow fonder, but it also means that upon their return, even their best may no longer be deemed good enough.

Are you looking forward to Chris Claremont’s return to Nightcrawler? Are there any creator returns that have disappointed you, or are there any that have surpassed your expectations? Let me know in the comments below.
(Gary)

Give it a listen!

WTF?! Panel of the Day
Batman’s orders are becoming more and more ambiguous…
(Aquadude)

WTF?! Panel of the Day

Batman’s orders are becoming more and more ambiguous…

(Aquadude)

Hello, folks, it’s the ever faithful Black Watcher here, bringing you another edition of sweet sweet nothing. Yep, I apologise, everybody for the lack of anything substantial tonight as, unfortunately, University requires effort sometimes as I am quite painfully rediscovering.
I will however give you this beautiful piece of artwork from the Italian enigma himself: Andrea Sorrentino. Expect something decent as soon as this essay has been conquered. Until then, and to all the wrestling fans on the page, enjoy ‘Mania, and I’ll see you guys later on!
Do svidanya,
(The Black Watcher)

Hello, folks, it’s the ever faithful Black Watcher here, bringing you another edition of sweet sweet nothing. Yep, I apologise, everybody for the lack of anything substantial tonight as, unfortunately, University requires effort sometimes as I am quite painfully rediscovering.

I will however give you this beautiful piece of artwork from the Italian enigma himself: Andrea Sorrentino. Expect something decent as soon as this essay has been conquered. Until then, and to all the wrestling fans on the page, enjoy ‘Mania, and I’ll see you guys later on!

Do svidanya,

(The Black Watcher)

It’s Saturday night and we’re bored so here is a bonus killer question.Best Quote from a Comic Book movie.My vote goes to Doctor Manhattan from Watchmen."Miracles. Events with astronomical odds of occurring, like oxygen turning into gold. I’ve longed to witness such an event, and yet I neglect that in human coupling, millions upon millions of cells compete to create life, for generation after generation until, finally, your mother loves a man, Edward Blake, the Comedian, a man she has every reason to hate, and out of that contradiction, against unfathomable odds, it’s you - only you - that emerged. To distill so specific a form, from all that chaos. It’s like turning air into gold. A miracle. And so… I was wrong. Now dry your eyes, and let’s go home."(Ian)

It’s Saturday night and we’re bored so here is a bonus killer question.

Best Quote from a Comic Book movie.

My vote goes to Doctor Manhattan from Watchmen.

"Miracles. Events with astronomical odds of occurring, like oxygen turning into gold. I’ve longed to witness such an event, and yet I neglect that in human coupling, millions upon millions of cells compete to create life, for generation after generation until, finally, your mother loves a man, Edward Blake, the Comedian, a man she has every reason to hate, and out of that contradiction, against unfathomable odds, it’s you - only you - that emerged. To distill so specific a form, from all that chaos. It’s like turning air into gold. A miracle. And so… I was wrong. Now dry your eyes, and let’s go home."

(Ian)

Good evening true believers!This evening I hope to entertain you with my ramblings and recommendation of yet another fantastic amphibious adventure of ‘nobody’s favourite superhero’ with ‘Aquaman: The throne of Atlantis’
This third collected volume details Arthur Curry’s past and heritage returning to haunt him despite his previous reluctance to confront it.Spanning over both the Justice League and Aquaman titles, tonight the focus will purely on the latter, written by Geoff Johns and illustrated by a collection of various artists.
Having long since lost contact with his people, Aquaman has built a new life for himself on the surface world with his wife Mera.As a founding member of the Justice League Arthur’s loyalties are divided when the people of Atlantis, lead by Arthur’s half brother and king of the Atlantans Orm, declare war on the people of the surface, killing thousands in a retaliation to an ‘accidental’ bombing test over the oceans that inadvertently caused great destruction to Atlantis.Pleading his fellow members of the Justice League for a chance to peacefully resolve this conflict without any further bloodshed, Aquaman approaches his brother in hopes to reason with him into calling off the assault and retreating to the oceans.Arthur’s efforts to stop the war are dismissed however, as his former followers and their current king believe an eye for an eye is the only conclusion to the recent events and to establish themselves as a nation of people to be feared by the surface dwellers.
Caught between home and heritage, Aquaman must choose between the devotion of the people of Atlantis, who would embrace him as their rightful king and the inhabitants of the surface who openly mock him and label him a ‘second class superhero’
Geoff Johns delivers yet another fantastic, well presented title of epic proportions, his recent work with Aquaman especially has been fantastic, leading to this climactic third volume that tests the very core of the character and establishes him as one of the gems of DC. Stripping the character down to his very DNA, Johns spotlights Aquaman as a character caught between two worlds, in both a physical and emotional sense, desperate to halt the conflict between the warring nations.Throne of Atlantis not only introduces the people of the surface to the Atlantan nation but also the readers themselves, who until this point had yet to have had Atlantis revealed since the new 52 reboot, save for Mera, Vulko and Aquaman himself. Until this point there had been serious doubt by the surface world that the submerged nation had even existed at all, which was a nice touch and also reminiscent to the attitude to Thor’s Asgard in the Ultimate Marvel titles.
The artwork of the Aquaman titles have been superb since the relaunch, reflecting the serious tone of which the storyline has been following and the no-nonsense attitude of the title character despite the ridicule he often endures from the general public.The scope and scale of each panel can only be described as epic, with fantastically detailed battle scenes in an outstanding, modernised look, the illustrative style really brings this title to life.
A fantastic edition to the Aquaman series, while some felt that the second volume fell flat compared to the first I promise that fans of the character will no be disappointed in this spectacular third act!Gripping storyline paired with beautiful visuals, it’s a must have for fans and newcomers alike!
So what did you think true believers, did Aquaman’s third instalment since the relaunch float your boat or did it leave you high and dry? As usual we’d love to hear from you, sound off in the comments below!
(Leeroy)

Good evening true believers!
This evening I hope to entertain you with my ramblings and recommendation of yet another fantastic amphibious adventure of ‘nobody’s favourite superhero’ with ‘Aquaman: The throne of Atlantis’

This third collected volume details Arthur Curry’s past and heritage returning to haunt him despite his previous reluctance to confront it.
Spanning over both the Justice League and Aquaman titles, tonight the focus will purely on the latter, written by Geoff Johns and illustrated by a collection of various artists.

Having long since lost contact with his people, Aquaman has built a new life for himself on the surface world with his wife Mera.
As a founding member of the Justice League Arthur’s loyalties are divided when the people of Atlantis, lead by Arthur’s half brother and king of the Atlantans Orm, declare war on the people of the surface, killing thousands in a retaliation to an ‘accidental’ bombing test over the oceans that inadvertently caused great destruction to Atlantis.
Pleading his fellow members of the Justice League for a chance to peacefully resolve this conflict without any further bloodshed, Aquaman approaches his brother in hopes to reason with him into calling off the assault and retreating to the oceans.
Arthur’s efforts to stop the war are dismissed however, as his former followers and their current king believe an eye for an eye is the only conclusion to the recent events and to establish themselves as a nation of people to be feared by the surface dwellers.

Caught between home and heritage, Aquaman must choose between the devotion of the people of Atlantis, who would embrace him as their rightful king and the inhabitants of the surface who openly mock him and label him a ‘second class superhero’

Geoff Johns delivers yet another fantastic, well presented title of epic proportions, his recent work with Aquaman especially has been fantastic, leading to this climactic third volume that tests the very core of the character and establishes him as one of the gems of DC. 
Stripping the character down to his very DNA, Johns spotlights Aquaman as a character caught between two worlds, in both a physical and emotional sense, desperate to halt the conflict between the warring nations.
Throne of Atlantis not only introduces the people of the surface to the Atlantan nation but also the readers themselves, who until this point had yet to have had Atlantis revealed since the new 52 reboot, save for Mera, Vulko and Aquaman himself. Until this point there had been serious doubt by the surface world that the submerged nation had even existed at all, which was a nice touch and also reminiscent to the attitude to Thor’s Asgard in the Ultimate Marvel titles.

The artwork of the Aquaman titles have been superb since the relaunch, reflecting the serious tone of which the storyline has been following and the no-nonsense attitude of the title character despite the ridicule he often endures from the general public.
The scope and scale of each panel can only be described as epic, with fantastically detailed battle scenes in an outstanding, modernised look, the illustrative style really brings this title to life.

A fantastic edition to the Aquaman series, while some felt that the second volume fell flat compared to the first I promise that fans of the character will no be disappointed in this spectacular third act!
Gripping storyline paired with beautiful visuals, it’s a must have for fans and newcomers alike!

So what did you think true believers, did Aquaman’s third instalment since the relaunch float your boat or did it leave you high and dry? 
As usual we’d love to hear from you, sound off in the comments below!

(Leeroy)

Hey guys. Our friends over at Red Hot Comics have their weekly previews list posted and also links to their Preacher auction!Just cut and paste to support local businesses. (Jamfeb )

Hey guys. Our friends over at Red Hot Comics have their weekly previews list posted and also links to their Preacher auction!
Just cut and paste to support local businesses. 
(Jamfeb )